#5SlideMovies: ‘Parasite’

Updated: Jan 16

Understanding poetic storytelling from this Korean Oscar-winning film

‘Parasite’ revolves around a poor, unemployed family (the Kims) that tricks their way to employment in a rich household (the Parks).
‘Parasite’ revolves around a poor, unemployed family (the Kims) that tricks their way to employment in a rich household (the Parks).

I finally watched Parasite on New Year’s Eve, more than two years after its release. (It’s available on Amazon Prime Video.)


This Academy Award winner is one of those movies your conscious mind fails to understand the deal about but your subconscious mind instantly connects with.


Both parties, however, agree that director Bong Joon Ho has used a poetic way to tell a simple story, which is something I want to learn for my upcoming works, including PiKu & ViRu 2. (Buy/download, read, and review the first PiKu & ViRu here; it's FREE on Kindle Unlimited!)


Revolving around a poor, unemployed family (the Kims) that tricks their way to employment in a rich household (the Parks), Parasite also has an interesting graph after the midpoint where both families’ true natures begin to unfold.


I highly recommend this film so you can challenge yourself as a movie viewer and have a distinct opinion on it.


For now, here are 5 of the most poetic metaphors from the film. Read about my favourite moment from the film here.

Ki-Jung and Ki-Woo rehearse their tune before ringing the musical doorbell.
Ki-Jung and Ki-Woo rehearse their tune before ringing the musical doorbell.
The Kims’ last supper together.
The Kims’ last supper together.
The 3 seasons in Ki-Woo’s life—(sun)rise, (rain)fall, and the season of eternal hope.
The 3 seasons in Ki-Woo’s life—(sun)rise, (rain)fall, and the season of eternal hope.
Head and heart.
Head and heart.
The rich Dong Ik’s disgust versus the poor Ki Taek’s disgust.
The rich Dong Ik’s disgust versus the poor Ki Taek’s disgust.

Download Parasite’s screenplay from here.

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